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Kara Belinsky

Kara is an Associate Professor of Biology at the State University of New York at New Paltz where she conducts research with her undergraduate students and teaches Ornithology, Animal Behavior, General Biology for majors and Biology Today for non-majors. Kara received her undergraduate degree in Biology from Skidmore College, her PhD in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology from Umass Amherst, and completed a post doctoral fellowship at Texas Tech University with field work at the Cary Institute. Her current research focusses on communication behavior, urban ecology, and the conservation of songbirds. To learn more about her research and students, follow her lab on Instagram @newpaltzornithology.

 
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Steve Chorvas

Steve is a self-taught naturalist with a deep interest in the birds and butterflies of the Catskill Mountains and Mid-Hudson Valley region.

Steve is a field trip leader for several organizations, including the John Burroughs Natural History Society and the Esopus Creek Conservancy, and has conducted annual breeding bird surveys on the summits of several Catskill Mountain High Peaks for the Vermont Center for Ecostudies.

 
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Joan Collins

A New York State licensed bird guide, bird walk leader, writer, and speaker on ornithology topics, Joan also belongs to the ranks of the intrepid Adirondack 46ers (having climbed all 46 peaks in the Adirondacks over 4,000 feet).

Joan is a serious ear-birder and is fascinated by bird vocalizations/sounds. The nocturnal world of sound often keeps her from getting any sleep!

 
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Peg DiBenedetto

An “accidental birder”, Peg fell in love with birds, birding, and birders a dozen years ago.

Primarily a raptor enthusiast and an eagler working with both balds and goldens, she is a co-chair of the Research Committee of the Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society, and a member of the Eastern Golden Eagle Working Group.

Peg's is a Catskill Center Board Member and her main passions, besides eagles, are attending birding conferences and organizing them. Her favorite tee shirt says “Sorry - My Birds Eat Your Birds”.

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Julie hart

A native Vermonter, Julie started birding while working as a bird conservation intern with National Audubon (Audubon New York) + the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

She spent several years chasing Bicknell’s Thrush around the mountains of the Northeast and Hispaniola, before moving to Wyoming to study the impacts of climate change on Cassia Crossbill in southern Idaho.

She is currently the Project Coordinator for the third Breeding Bird Atlas in NY.

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Andy Mason

Andy Mason is co-President of the Delaware-Otsego Audubon Society and past President of the NY State Ornithological Association, and past chair of the Audubon Council of NY State.

He has lead bird workshops for the Appalachian Mountain Club and the Zen Mountain Monastery.

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Katie Palm

Katie Palm is the Catskill Center’s Director of Programs.

Before she joined us, Katie was the Education Specialist at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, DC, where she created a volunteer program and planned all the educational programs for adults and children.

She has also worked at Longwood Gardens, the Watershed Agricultural Council and for Cornell Cooperative Extension as the Broome County Consumer/Community Horticulturist.

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Nathan pieplow


The author of the Peterson Field Guide to Bird Sounds, Nathan is an avid bird sound recordist and videographer.

He is the author of the bird sound blog Earbirding.com, an author of the Colorado Birding Trail, and former editor of the journal Colorado Birds.

He teaches writing and rhetoric at the University of Colorado in Boulder.

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Tod Winston

A lifelong birder and gardener, Tod grew up on a small wooded farm in rural Pennsylvania—and still recalls his first warbler "fall-out" there (and the singing Prothonotary Warbler that showed up that day) with wonder.

Todd managed the property where he grew up for wildlife—focusing on native flowers, shrubs, and trees. This deepening interest in native plant ecology eventually led to his taking on the role of manager of National Audubon's Plants for Birds program.